Since then, P2P lending has exploded onto the scene. More companies like Prosper and Lending Club have jumped on the P2P bandwagon, and investors are beginning to realize it’s an excellent source of passive income. As an investor, you fund an account and loan small amounts (like $25) to a variety of borrowers across a broad set of risk levels, creating a diverse portfolio.
Renting out a space room on AirBNB is really easy and their site handles the advertising, payment and feedback system. The process of having your site advertised is quite passive, but having someone in your house has similar risks to real estate investing, that makes it quite hands on. It is worth considering if you are rattling around in a large house, or have a granny-flat that is vacant.
Do you have any items you don’t use all the time that others would like to borrow? Useful items like a truck, trailer, trampoline, kayak, or even your own yard could earn you passive income as rental items. This also includes renting out spare rooms in your house with the help of websites like Airbnb. Hop on your favorite social media site, upload pictures of your items, set a price, and tell the world they’re ready for rent.
Facebook’s algorithm determines the types of content that an individual user sees, and according to Facebook, the goal in 2018 is to give users “…less public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media.” This typically results in less trending content from businesses, but rather content from publications and individuals. Of course, when a product gets featured in trending content on Facebook, it gets a lot of attention.
Market concentration is used when smaller firms account for large percentage of the total market. It measures the extent of domination of sales by one or more firms in a particular market. The market concentration ratio is measured by the concentration ratio. Description: The market concentration ratio measures the combined market share of all the top firms in the industry. ‘Market Share’ is us
Buy vending machines and put them into areas that receive high levels of foot traffic. The investment cost is high, but from then on it is a matter of restocking the machines as needed. If you are able to find success with your first machine, there is nothing stopping you replicating it many times over. This business model is very passive, but the high start up cost and low potential for super profits holds it back in my opinion.
It was easier recouping the lost $60,000 in rental-property income than I expected. For so long, my primary mindset for passive income was rental income. Having $815,000 less mortgage debt but still generating roughly the same amount of passive income with a much larger cash balance feels great. Further, my passive-income portfolio got even more passive, which is good as a stay-at-home dad to a newborn.
Our favorite platform for this is RealtyMogul because you get the flexibility to invest as little as $1,000, but can also participate in REITs and private placements – typically not offered to the public. Investors can fund real estate loans to gain passive income or buy an equity share in a property for potential appreciation. Their platform is open to both accredited and non-accredited investors.

Gives away valuable products or services. “Free” is the most powerful word in a marketer’s vocabulary. Most viral marketing programs give away valuable products or services to attract attention. Free email services, free information, free “cool” buttons, free software programs that perform powerful functions but not as much as you get in the “pro” version. “Cheap” or “inexpensive” may generate a wave of interest, but “free” will usually do it much faster.


There is debate on the origination and the popularization of the specific term viral marketing, though some of the earliest uses of the current term are attributed to the Harvard Business School graduate Tim Draper and faculty member Jeffrey Rayport. The term was later popularized by Rayport in the 1996 Fast Company article "The Virus of Marketing",[12] and Tim Draper and Steve Jurvetson of the venture capital firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson in 1997 to describe Hotmail's practice of appending advertising to outgoing mail from their users.[13] An earlier attestation of the term is found in PC User magazine in 1989, but with a somewhat differing meaning.[14][15]
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