Definition: Unique Selling Proposition or USP is the one feature or the perceived benefit of a good which makes it unique from the rest of the competing brands in the market. It is that very reason which motivates a buyer to purchase that product even though it might be costlier than other products. Description: Unique Selling Proposition or USP is a very important concept used during the time when a company promotes its product through its advertisements in both TV as well as print media which eventually attracts a consumer to buy a particular product. The key to boost the sales of the product effectively through advertising is to highlight the USP of the product prominently. Unless you highlight the USP, consumers will not be tempted to buy your product. Every product should have its own USP, which makes it stand apart from other products in the similar category. USP is different for different products. Let’s take an example of a restaurant which is very famous across the world for its quick Subway Sandwiches. The company makes the sandwiches healthier for consumers. Consumers who are looking for a quick meal can walk into any subway outlet and get a quick sandwich made, which contains nutritional value. In this way the company is able to create its own niche market across town in India. The USP of the product is a nutritious sandwich at an affordable price. USP is a very important component in developing the product. A strong unique selling proposition makes you stand apart and also plays an important role in branding your product. But, USP alone can guarantee to a product’s success. Superior product quality and at par service, both before and after-sale are very important in creating the foundations of a market for a product. Always remember, with a distinct USP, the company doesn’t even have to bother about competition because if you have developed something which has not been developed by others, then you are the only player or a market leader in that specific product category (Example – iPpod by Apple).


You also get to see specific details about each loan, including what the borrower is using it for, the state they live in, how long the pay-off period is, what the monthly payments are, and what rate the borrower will pay. It helps you get a better picture of what type of risk you’re exposing yourself to, and you get to take more control over your investment.
Some good writing here! I am a realtor myself and frequently get in touch with clients that consider buying a realty estate a conservative of investing. I once heard of a transport company in Vienna, Austria, which focused their entire profit on buying eventually every house available in the downtown for about 80 years. That must be some of a passive income!
However, this comes back to the old discussion of pain versus pleasure. We will always do more to avoid pain than we will to gain pleasure. When our backs are against the wall, we act. When they're not, we relax. The truth is that the pain-versus-pleasure paradigm only operates in the short term. We'll only avoid pain in the here and now. Often not in the long term.
Haha, that is too funny. I wanted to make an app back in the day called “MyShares” (You can probably tell how I cam up with the name at the time). The idea was that I would loan out books and DVD’s and then would never get them back. Then I thought, how cool would it be if I could rent those items out and that would motivate people to bring them back. Obviously, books and DVD’s are cheap, so this isn’t the money maker. The idea that would probably make the most money would be things like tools, ATVs, etc.
Cash Cow is one of the four categories under the Boston Consulting Group's growth matrix that represents a division which has a big market share in a low-growth industry or a sector. It is referred to an asset or a business, which once paid off, will continue giving consistent cash flows throughout its life. Description: A Cash Cow is a metaphor used for a business or a product, which exhibits
I will share what we did, because it’s an incredible success story. We used an existing tax loophole where if you sell your primary residence (after having lived there at least two years) you get to keep your profit tax-free. So, we stair-stepped. We bought house after house, at least two years apart, used the profit money to pay down on the next house (so on and so forth, yadda yadda) building up equity as we went along… and now, we own a $600,000 house debt-free. And now we are using our paid-off home as leverage to borrow money to buy commercial buildings to rent out. I like commercial because it’s a BUSINESS transaction… kids, pets, other wear and tear that you see with residential rentals is nonexistent. People take care of their business space much better than residential. You have to be in a good area for renting out commercial – a thriving business community – to make this work. But that’s how we “made it”, and though it took 15 years, we will have residual income to take care of us when we’re old enough to retire. People made fun of us for moving so much, but who’s laughing now? 😉 Oh, and our child only had to change schools once (and we wanted to anyway) because we stayed in the same general area as we moved around. We were careful not to disrupt his life too much.

Residual income is money that is earned on a recurring basis, typically as the result of a single original action. Rather than earning an hourly wage, residual income is typically generated through an initial investment of time or money with the goal of earning continuous payments. Once the initial investment, product, or service is made, the ongoing income that is earned is generally passive in nature.
The reason to make use or virality, the ease in spreading and sharing, is however a double-edged sword. We cannot forget that in this type of campaign, a large part of the control falls into the hands of the users, and we risk the message being misinterpreted or parodied. On the other hand, a successful viral campaign can work miracles for your brand’s results.
×